« Cooperstown Odyssey | Main | Blog vs. Blog »

September 22, 2008

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

paul l albano

dear perry, how are you doing? paul

Marcus W. Dickson

Interesting article that really covers a lot of the issues around the Merkle play and its impact -- especially relevant with Hank O'Day being considered for the Hall of Fame.

One small point -- the rule that no run scores if the last out is a force out developed a bit more slowly than suggested here. The 1845 rules say "Three hands out, all out", but this was interpreted literally -- if the run scored before the out, the run counted. By the mid-1850s, the rule had become "If two hands are already out, a player running home at the time a ball is struck, cannot make an ace if the striker is caught out." So if the striker (batter) was put out in some way other than being caught out, the run could still score. By 1860, the rule was "If two hands are already out, no player running home at the time a ball is struck, can make an ace if the striker is put out." Now, no matter how the striker was put out, the run didn't count (and he was only considered the striker until he achieved first base), but if the third out were made on a force at a different base, the run could still count.

Floyd Sullivan

Ironically, according to O'Day's report to Pulliam, Emslie, the field umpire that day, actually called Merkle out. O'Day also pretty much says that it was because McGinnity interfered with the play, so whether the ball was the game ball or not is a moot point.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Blog powered by Typepad

Become a Fan